Feature Squash Critique

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Marge C. Enriquez’s article entitled, Quinito Henson and Menchu Genato—why they love squash, ‘the healthiest sport’, in the lifestyle page of Philippine Daily Inquirer generally talks about the benefits of the sport, squash, to the couple, especially to Joaquin “Quinito” Henson.

© Inquirer.net

Looking younger than his age, Henson claims that aside from his good genes and the loving care of his wife, Carmencita “Menchu” Genato, it is his sport played for over 30 years that gives him youthful looks. He even thinks that playing squash is the secret to staying energetic and relatively fit at his age.

© Inquirer.net

On playing with her husband, Genato gained the power as her asset. She then won the 1st Women’s Squash Championship and the two other sets in a best-of-three match.

Henson supports the Ten Healthiest Sports article in Forbes.com by Neal Santelmann stating that squash is the healthiest sport by saying, “In squash, you exercise the whole body more than swimming, basketball, rowing, mountain climbing.”

The story specified above possesses certain elements that determine whether (or not) an item is a feature article. First, its lead, unlike in hard news, does not necessarily have to have the how and the “Five Ws” — who, what, where, when, and why, in the very first paragraph.

Second, the flow of feature articles often applies more of a leisurely pace than of hard news articles. Feature articles are usually about amusing, entertaining, and life revealing kinds of stories.

Lastly, human element is the major focus of feature articles. Many editors even call feature stories “people stories” for people is commonly the main constituent of an article. Thus, it is no doubt that Enriquez’s story today is a feature article.